The Chemistry of Love

Lucy Bell-Young

14th February 2018

Chemistry, Science

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Dozens of multicoloured love heats drawn on a wall

In honour of Valentine’s Day, we thought we would take a look at the chemistry behind the culprit of this love-hate holiday: love. From that first high school crush to the marital vow, we’re looking into what makes us giddy and what keeps us obsessed. It’s that time of year again: Valentine’s Day. Whether you’re… Continue reading »

The Chemistry of Fire

Lucy Bell-Young

31st January 2018

Science

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High resolution close up of camp fire

We’ve all heard of fire, and see it almost every day in matches, lighters, fireworks, gas hobs, and fire places. But this ostensibly simple reaction is actually a complex scientific event. What is Fire Exactly? Fire is an exothermic, self-perpetuating reaction that happens when a solid, liquid or gas-phase fuel undergoes rapid oxidation. This is… Continue reading »

This Day in Chemistry: Sir Edward Frankland 

Lucy Bell-Young

18th January 2018

Science

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A portrait of Sir Edward Frankland, an important 19th century chemist

Born in Lancashire, England, Sir Edward Frankland is one of the most important British chemists in history. The father of organometallic chemistry, with a multitude of equally ground-breaking achievements under his belt, Frankland has helped to shape the world of chemistry we know today. So why isn’t he more well-known? On 18th January 1825, Edward… Continue reading »

The Chemistry of Chocolate

Lucy Bell-Young

13th December 2017

Chemicals, Science

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Birds-eye view of cocoa beans and squares of dark chocolate on a table

With Christmas right around the corner, it seems an appropriate time to look into the world’s favourite treat: chocolate. Advent calendars and selection boxes are being arranged in tempting displays in every shop, and now more than ever the population are eyeing up the discounted Lindor boxes glowing ruby red beneath a string of fluorescent lights.… Continue reading »